Sourdough bread may sound difficult, and yet anyone can make it with a little help. In fact, sourdough is a really easy bread to make that requires very little to no kneading. You can find out a lot more about sourdough bread by following Natasha Krajnc’s website. There she gives you amazing recipes involving sourdough bread.

In this article, we are going to help you learn how to make sourdough bread.

What Is Sourdough?

sourdough bread

Sourdough bread is slowly fermented bread. It is distinctive because it will rise without using commercial yeast. Instead, a live fermented culture called a sourdough starter is used to make sourdough bread.

This bread is well-known for its distinctive acidic flavor, chewy texture, and crackly, crunchy crust.

How Do You Make A Sourdough Starter?

You’ll require a sourdough starter before you can start baking bread. A live culture is created from water and flour.  After being combined, the mixture will start to ferment, which will grow the wild yeasts and bacteria that are already present.

For maximum rising power, your starter has to be kept strong with frequent feedings of flour and water. When your starter starts to bubble and double in size, it is ready to use. Depending on the temperature, this could take anywhere from 2 to 12 hours or longer.

Making Sourdough Bread

Ingredients

You will need the following ingredients to create a loaf of sourdough bread.

  • 150g of sourdough starter,
  • 25g olive oil,
  • 250g water,
  • 10g sea salt,
  • 500g bread flour.

Step 1: Create Your Dough

Whisk together the sourdough starter, oil and water together in a large bowl. Then add in your sea salt and bread flour. You want to combine everything together with your hands until the flour has been completely incorporated.

The dough should feel quite rough and dry.

Step 2: Let Your Dough Rest

Now that everything has been combined, you should cover the bowl with either a damp kitchen towel or plastic wrap. Leave the dough to rest for around 30 minutes at room temperature.

Step 3: Shape And Rise

After 30 minutes, the gluten should have started to work. Shape the dough into a ball inside the bowl. Cover the bowl once again and let the dough rise at room temperature.

For this rise, you are waiting for the dough to double in size. However, with this rise it could take anywhere between 3 and 12 hours, depending on the temperature.

sourdough bread

Step 4: Divide And Shape Your Dough

Once risen, transfer the dough to a surface that has been lightly dusted with flour. To make two loaves, divide the dough in half. Otherwise, leave it whole to create one loaf.

Starting at the top, fold the dough toward the center to create a round loaf. Then turn the loaf and fold over the next section of dough. Repeat this action until you have a circle.

Step 5: Rise Once More

Choose a pot to place and bake your sourdough bread in. You need to choose a pot that traps in the moisture and heat. A lot of chefs like to use a bread pan or a Dutch oven. However, any oven safe pot is perfect.

Coat the bottom of your pot with cornmeal and place your dough inside. Then cover and allow your dough a final 30 minutes to 1 hour to rise.

Step 6: Score And Bake

Preheat your oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Then grab a serrated knife. Create a cut around 2 to 3 inches along the center of the dough. This cut helps for the dough to expand and steam to be released.

Put the lid on your pot and bake your dough for 20 minutes. After this time frame, remove the lid and continue to bake for an additional 40 minutes. Continue to bake until the bread is a deep golden color or reaches an internal temperature of 205 to 210 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 7: Allow Time To Rest

sourdough bread

Once cooked, take the bread out of the oven and place it on a wire rack. It is important to allow the bread at least an hour to cool. If you cut it too soon, the texture will be too soft.

Conclusion

Sourdough bread has a lot of steps to follow. However, by following the steps we have outlined above, you will be able to create one of the most delicious types of bread out there. It may be time-consuming, but the results are definitely worth it.

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